Classic Berlin

Classic Berlin

Exploring Berlin’s (take on) classical entertainment and Lifestyle

Youth: They’re not all social media-frenzied psychos. The Young Euro Classic has been strumming on since August 18th and will continue until September 3rd. With numerous symphonic youth orchestras from around the world playing some of the finest classical and contemporary compositions at the beautiful Konzerthaus Berlin on Gendarmenmarkt in Mitte, we’re reminded that tradition isn’t dead, and the future of Berlin is still classy.

Mitte: The cultural epicenter of Berlin

Doing their part to keep traditional, luxury entertainment alive in the cultural scene, the youth orchestras play some of the most beloved pieces from Beethoven to Shostakovich, showing that Berlin culture still caters to elegance. The more outrageous parts of Berlin events, lifestyle and fashion has helped build an iconic reputation for the city both historically and in modern times, and although that scene has offered plenty of room for experiment and creativity, it’s not everyone’s style, and the breadth of the city’s more traditional entertainment, regrettably, gets overlooked.

The multitude of history and art museums, operas, ballets and other beautiful events throughout the year create a unique juxtaposition to the wild nightlife of the city, and living in Berlin allows residents, rich or poor, to explore their classical interests with ease. The Mitte neighborhood is Berlin’s Manhattan from the sleek, modern homes to endless tourist attractions, so it’s no surprise that Mitte holds the majority of the cultural institutions as well. Museum Island itself is home to some of the most famous places such as the Pergamon Museum, the Old and New National Galleries and the Berliner Dom, the latter of which puts on unforgettable choir and organ concerts throughout the year.

The museums put on a number of both recurring and one-time events such as the Long Night of the Museums, offering access to artistic and dance productions and entrance to the museums until late into the night. Just off of the island, the Komische Oper Berlin offers a Berlin style signature twist on classic entertainment with avant-garde productions of classic and modern theater and musical shows. The theater not only puts on creative renditions of famous theater pieces (The vaudevillian production of Bertolt Brecht’s The Threepenny Opera was absolutely fabulous), but it also pays homage to the great Jewish operettas, which were banned in the 1930s and 1940s. The suppressed and forgotten works are given a new life and get a second chance on the stage of the Komische Oper Berlin.

Revolution in Charlotteburg opera

Out to the West, the Deutsche Oper Berlin sits rather inconspicuously on Bismarckstraße. Outside of the city center, the area is a bit more calm, and large, opulent homes along the side streets bring out that more graceful element of the Berlin lifestyle. The Deutsche Oper Berlin keeps its charm quietly hidden on the inside. Hosting operas, orchestra concerts and the Berlin State Ballet, the building has a modern Bauhaus style, which represents its history perfectly. Calling its own 1912 birth a “miniature cultural revolution,” the Deutsche Oper Berlin held a torch to modernism in its more utilitarian design, allowing full view to the stage from every seat.

Classical entertainment weaves past and present in diverse and exceptional ways, the Young Euro Classic highlights the younger generation’s interest and will to keep tradition alive, and the city’s museums, concert halls and theatres will continue to offer a place for them to experiment and thrive. Berlin culture and lifestyle delight themselves in offering a bit of everything, but the classier pieces deserve their position in the spotlight, not just for their strength and presence, but also in the particularities that make them shining examples of Berlin’s extraordinary character.

 

By Alice Bauer